Undergraduate Catalog 2009-2011

Biomolecular Sciences

 

Faculty

J.P. Mulrooney, Chair; M. A. Davis, B. L. Dobbs-McAuliffe, B. Hoopengardner, M. A. Kapper, T. R. King, K. A. Martin, C. L. Watson (Dept. phone: 860-832-3560; fax: 860-832-3562)

 

Department Overview

The Department of Biomolecular Sciences offers instruction in molecular biology, microbiology, cell biology, genetics, development, and physiology that is strongly integrated with the theory and practice of molecular biological research. The department offers two BS degrees in biomolecular sciences and participates in an additional interdisciplinary program that leads to a BS degree in biochemistry. In addition, the department offers a minor in biomolecular science appropriate for students with majors other than biomolecular science. In addition, the department is pleased to offer health-related courses to support undergraduate programs in gerontology, nursing, physical education, athletic training, and other non-science majors.

Student-centered research is a feature of all undergraduate programs in biomolecular sciences. Located in Copernicus Hall, the Department of Biomolecular Sciences includes a wide range of modern research equipment in laboratories designed both for class instruction and for independent student research. Special facilities include a protein purification and analysis facility, a cell culture facility, a histology facility, a molecular genetics research laboratory, a laboratory animal care suite, a zebrafish facility, a microbiology laboratory that is certified by the Connecticut Department of Public Health, and several computer laboratories. Student-centered biomolecular research activity is also promoted, fostered, and supported by the Biotechnology Institute at CCSU, an interdisciplinary organization (housed in the Department of Biomolecular Sciences) that is dedicated to developing college graduates with excellent research skills. The Department of Biomolecular Sciences is strongly committed to student advising and routinely promotes and participates in academic and extracurricular activities aimed at facilitating student learning, community engagement, and success.

 

Programs

Major in Biomolecular Sciences, BS (Non-teaching, 35 credits)

Core (11 credits):

BMS 102* Introduction to Biomolecular Science 3
BMS 103* Introduction to Biomolecular Science Laboratory 1
BMS 190 Introduction to Research I
0.5
BMS 201 Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology 4
BMS 290 Introduction to Research II 0.5
BMS 390 Independent Research in Biomolecular Science 1
BMS 491 Advanced Independent Research in Biomolecular Science 1-3

and either the General Program or the Biotechnology Specialization, which follow.

 *BIO 121 may be substituted for BMS 102/103.

General Program

This program offers a curricular focus on molecular and cellular mechanisms that is integrated with organismal physiology and emphasizes hands-on learning through laboratory instruction and independent student research. This degree is appropriate for students wishing to prepare for professional training in medicine or for graduate study in such areas as genetics, microbiology, molecular biology, or cell physiology.

This program requires completion of the core, plus three laboratory courses.

General Program Requirements

BMS 306 Genetics 4
   or

BMS 307 Genomics 4
BMS 311 Cell Biology 4
BMS 316 Microbiology 4

 

Directed Electives (additional credits to total 35 credits in the major, chosen from the following):

BMS 306 Genetics 4
BMS 307 Genomics 4
BMS 318 Anatomy and Physiology I 4
BMS 319 Anatomy and Physiology II 4
BMS 320 Histology 2
BMS 322 Comparative Animal Physiology 4
BMS 340 Biomolecular Techniques
2
BMS 380 Emergency Medical Technician (3 credits only of this 6-credit course) 3
BMS 391 Internship in Biomolecular Science 1-3
BMS 412 Human Physiology 3
BMS 413 Human Physiology Laboratory 1
BMS 414 Pharmacology, Physiology, and Drug Development 3
BMS 415 Advanced Exploration in Cell, Molecular, and Physiological Biology 3
BMS 416 Experimental Microbiology 2
BMS 490 Topics in Biomolecular Sciences 3-4
BMS 492 Mentorship in Biomolecular Science  1
BMS 495 Capstone in Molecular Biology 4
BMS 496 Capstone in Biosynthesis, Bioenergetics and Metabolic Regulation 3
BMS 497 Biosynthesis, Bioenergetics and Metabolic Regulation Laboratory 1
BMS 499 Undergraduate Thesis in Biomolecular Sciences 1
CHEM 320 Biophysical Chemistry 3
CHEM 354 Biochemistry 3
CHEM 455 Biochemistry Laboratory 1
CHEM 456 Toxicology 3
BIO 416 Immunology 3
BIO 449 Plant Physiology 3
BIO 450 Investigations in Plant Physiology 1

 

Biotechnology Specialization

This program offers a strong focus on the principles of cell and molecular biology and emphasizes the practice of biomolecular research. It is designed to prepare students for advanced study in the biomolecular sciences or careers that use the concepts and techniques of molecular and cellular biology.

This program requires completion of the core, plus four laboratory courses, including:

Biotechnology Specialization Requirements

BMS 306 Genetics
4
or
BMS 307
Genomics 4
BMS 311 Cell Biology 4
BMS 316 Microbiology 4
BMS 495 Capstone in Molecular Biology 4

Directed Electives  

BMS 306 Genetics 4
BMS 307 Genomics 4
BMS 320 Histology 2
BMS 340 Biomolecular Techniques
2
BMS 391 Internship in Biomolecular Science 1-3
BMS 415
Advanced Exploration in Cell, Molecular, and Physiological Biology 3
BMS 416 Experimental Microbiology 2
BMS 490 Topics in Biomolecular Sciences 3-4
BMS 496 Capstone in Biosynthesis, Bioenergetics, and Metabolic Regulation
3
BMS 497 Biosynthesis, Bioenergetics and Metabolic Regulation Laboratory 1
BMS 499 Undergraduate Thesis in Biomolecular Sciences
1
CHEM 354 Biochemistry 3
CHEM 455 Biochemistry Laboratory 1
CHEM 456 Toxicology 3
BIO 449 Plant Physiology 3
BIO 450 Investigations in Plant Physiology 1

Related Requirements (16-28 credits)

In addition to the 35 credits in the major, made up of the core and one of the advanced components described above, the student must take:

MATH 119 Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry 4
MATH 125 Applied Calculus 3
   or

MATH 152 Calculus I 4
CHEM 161 General Chemistry I 3
CHEM 163 General Chemistry II 3
CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I 3
CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1
CHEM 212 Organic Chemistry II 3
CHEM 213 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 1
PHYS 121 General Physics I 4
PHYS 122 General Physics II 4

Students must also maintain a student portfolio. While no minor is required for the BS in biomolecular sciences, a minor in science may be elected with a C- or better in related requirement courses CHEM 161, 162, 163, 164, PHYS 121, and 122. Some related requirement courses may also be counted to fulfill appropriate portions of the student's general education program.

Cross-listed Courses

BMS 318, 319, 412, and 413 are also listed in the course description section of the catalog with a BIO designator. These double- or cross-listed courses (i.e., BMS 318 and BIO 318) are considered fully equivalent.

500-Level Course Options

Undergraduate students who use the form, Enrollment in 500 Level Courses by Undergraduates, and who have at least 90 credits and a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher may (with the approval of the appropriate department chair and dean, School of Graduate Studies, and with appropriate prerequisites) choose any of the following 500-level courses in the directed elective portion of the advanced component of their major program:

BMS 500 Seminar in Biomolecular Science 1
BMS 516 Medical Microbiology 3
BMS 519 Physiology of Human Aging 3
BMS 540 Advanced Topics in Biomolecular Science 3-4
BMS 562 Developmental Biology 3
BMS 570 Advanced Genetics 3

 

Major in Biochemistry, BS

The BS program in biochemistry provides a strong foundation in both molecular biology and chemistry and is based on faculty, facilities, and research resources in both the Department of Biomolecular Sciences and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. In addition to in-class laboratory instruction, this interdisciplinary program emphasizes independent student research carried out under the guidance of a faculty member from either department. This program is designed to prepare students for careers or advanced study in biochemistry, molecular biology, or health-related fields. For more information, refer to the biochemistry page.

Portfolio Requirement

The portfolio requirement in biomolecular sciences will be formally introduced to students during the BMS 190 and 290 introductory core component of all major programs in biomolecular sciences. Minimally, the student portfolio must include a current resume, a current student graduation evaluation or transcript, a planned program of academic study (program sheets available from the Department of Biomolecular Sciences), a narrative describing the student’s goals for undergraduate education and graduate educational or career plans, abstracts of all independent study projects completed, and writing samples from one or more upper-level courses in the major. To fulfill the portfolio requirement in biomolecular sciences, the student portfolio must be reviewed with one or more faculty members in biomolecular sciences:

  • As a course requirement in BMS 190 and 290;

  • As a required component of all BMS 390, 391, or 491 independent studies or internships; and

  • Prior to application for graduation, as evidenced by submission of a Portfolio Requirement Completed form (available from the Department of Biomolecular Sciences and signed by the major advisor) to the biomolecular sciences chair.


Minor in Biomolecular Sciences (Non-teaching, 20 credits)

 

BMS 102 Introduction to Biomolecular Science 3
BMS 103 Introduction to Biomolecular Science Laboratory 1
BMS 190 Introduction to Research I
1
BMS 201 Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology 4
BMS 290 Introduction to Research II 1

and 11 additional credits of BMS courses, as approved by the biomolecular sciences advisor. BIO 121 may be substituted for BMS 102/103.

 

Minor in Gerontology

The minor in gerontology provides students with a solid background in different issues related to adult development and aging in order to prepare them to serve the aging population in various capacities. The minor incorporates courses from the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Education and Professional Studies, and Engineering and Technology. For more information, refer to the gerontology page.

 

CLICK HERE FOR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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