AboutAcademicsAdmissionsAlumni and FriendsAthleticsCampus Life
Home >
Committee on the Concerns of Women > Enough, a 5K Race Against Violence
page tools :


2013 Race

A very big thank you to Krystal Rich who conceived of this idea and made it happen!  Thank you Krystal!


 

Second Annual Enough! 5k Race to End Violence Teaches Resilience

By  Vanessa Stevens

Sunday’s second annual Enough!  5K Race to End Violence at Central Connecticut State University Sunday raised funds for the New Britain YWCA Sexual Assault Crisis center, which helps victims directly survive and cope with abuse. Several who ran in the Boston Marathon were invited by the Hartford Marathon Foundation, YWCA’s  co-sponsor, to race for free.

Several showed, some still sore from the marathon, identifiable by their blue and yellow jackets that read “Boston Strong.”

Dominique, a senior who lives in Guilford, has been running the Boston Marathon for two years. She says both years at Boston were memorable: Last year she endured a grueling eighty-eight degrees and this year, the bombings. Dominique said she felt like something had been guiding her away from the city, finishing moments before the first bomb went off, but didn’t know what transpired until she got a phone call from friends asking if she was okay.

 “When I found out, I was fueled. I wanted to show strength in light of what happened.”

Running more races is her proof of strength.

Also at the Enough! Race on Sunday, Joan of West Hartland ran Boston for the first and says she’ll return. “Because of the bombings,”  she said, “people in Boston and worldwide will be more vigilant. “[What happened Monday] reminds us not to not take life or our suspicions for granted.”

Guests and runners were invited to the student center to visit information tables, munch on pastries, fruits and have coffee, and hear from two speakers.

A survivor was raped, beaten and shot by strangers in a car late one night 24 years ago. He knows the random act wasn’t his fault  but says he often battles wanting  to self destruct.

In his poem, called “I Wish You Could Know How You Changed My Life” which he read aloud to the audience, he says “I’ve got to move on, I cannot look back, but every year on Dec. 27 you haunt me.”

When violence and terrorism occur the best way to find victory is to embrace resilience and bounce back.

“We have to press on even in the moments of violence,” assures the survivor, “whether the Boston Marathon, Domestic Violence, or what happens to you.

He stressed the importance of believing victims and told us not to think about when an incident happens, but what happens.

“With your support, they’ll get through it.”

The final speaker was Beth Holloway, mother to Natalee who was abducted eight years ago, raped and killed while vacationing  in Aruba.  Beth told her daughter’s story, and claimed she had every right to crawl into a hole and never come out, but instead prayed and focused on how there is hope  in anything, and that belief transformed her grief into motivation.

Holloway today has spoken to hundreds about her daughter’s story and has been a fierce advocate for other families, opening The Natalee Holloway Resource Center in the Museum of Crime and Punishment  in Washington DC,  where people can turn for help when a loved one goes missing.

“I am running with you, today”, she said, “and always, in our race against violence.”

*All proceeds from the race went to benefit the New Britain YWCA’s SACS program, which coordinates sexual assault victims with victim advocates, who accompany them to hospitals, police stations and even the courtroom. All services are free and confidential. For more information, call the New Britain hot line at (860)223-1787 or visit Connsacs.org.

Vanessa Stevens is a freelance writer, survivor, musician and songwriter. She frequently writes and  speaks against violence and founded The Purple Song Project which helps survivors of violence through song. Her original songs have been featured in documentaries and independent films and tv shows related to violence recovery. www.PurpleSong.com She can be reached atsingerwritervanessa@hotmail.com




 



2012 Race

A very big thank you to Krystal Rich who conceived of this idea and made it happen!  Thank you Krystal!



For Immediate Release

Contact: Vanessa Stevens

Po Box 426 Middlebury Ct 06762


Title: Survivors and Others Say “Enough!” to Sexual Violence.

Sunday April 22, 2012

More than 300 people lined up to race or walk at Central Connecticut State University Sunday to benefit Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services. (CONNSACS )

CONNSACS partnered with Hartford Marathon Foundation to hold its first ever Enough! 5K Race to End Sexual Violence, Sunday. Men, women and children wore teal tee shirts to commemorate teal being the color for sexual violence awareness.

The first race winner at 16:05 was Christopher Rosenberg of Old Saybrook, and first female winner, at 22:10, was 15 year old Kaeli Baker of Simsbury.  There were category races for children 9 and up.

The largest and possibly proudest group of all may have been those in not teal, but purple shirts. Purple with white writing in big bold white letters that read “Team Chloe.”

Thirty walkers and racers showed up that morning to walk in honor of sixteen year old Chloe Ottman who was brutally assaulted and murdered in Holy Land, Waterbury, Ct.  in the summer of 2010.

Derek Ottman, Chloe’s father, opened up about why he is here supporting the race and that running became a physical means of survival after his daughter’s murder and a means to rebuilding himself physically following the tragedy. I invited him personally to the speak out after the event. He said “If you put me on the spot, then I will speak out.”

At the “Speak Out” ceremony” held in Davidson Hall at the college,  survivors and others enjoyed sandwiches, pizza and coffee and could learn about CONNSACS, and also hear from Alvin Notice, father to Massachussetts native Tiana Notice who was murdered at University of Hartford on Feb. 14, 2009 by her ex boyfriend.

Derek Ottman did, in fact tell his daughter’s story, and moved the audience as he spoke about the epic adventure that his daughter went on with a schoolmate one summer day, unbeknownst to anyone it would end in her rape and murder.

“Where is the line where a man or a woman has to say I’m not going to go past a certain point?” Derek asked and ended his speech with the question that may be on every father’s mind, especially after something so horrific happens: “ When we talk to boys, define for them what a real man is and that no means no. It’s all about respect.”

Other men got up and spoke, like Dr. Jason Sikorski , who is faculty member in the Psychology Department as well as Chair of the Men’s Initiative in support of women sub-committee of the President’s Committee on the Concerns of Women.

“Violence is a public health epidemic, and since men are often the perpetrators, it is important that interventions focus on targeting men and the attitudes and beliefs that increase the risk that men will engage in violent acts. We, as men who wish to live healthy lives, must reject the ‘boys will be boys’ mentality and choose to think critically about how we wish to live our lives. Further, we should talk to other guys about our ideas. These types of talks amongst men can be one of a million things that we can do to reduce violence in our society.”

CONNSACS Executive Director Laura Cordes informed the audience that 3700 victims of sexual violence have been served at CONNSACS  in the past year, and New Britain YYWCA director Fran Murphy reminded everyone that CONNSACS services are free and confidential and available 24/7.

“Far too many victims and even survivors remain silent out of shame about what happened to them. You are not alone,” she said.

Dates are already being discussed for next year’s race.

Vanessa Stevens is a freelance writer, survivor, musician and songwriter. She frequently writes and  speaks against violence and founded The Purple Song Project which helps survivors of violence through song. Her original songs have been featured in documentaries and independent films and tv shows related to violence recovery. www.PurpleSong.com She can be reached atsingerwritervanessa@hotmail.com






Events


  • April, 2014 04/28
    • CCW Meeting 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM

© 2013 CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSITY  CONTACT US   SITE MAP      WEBMASTER      DIRECTIONS   CAMPUS ACCESSIBILITY
email page print page small type large type large type
powered by finalsite