Graduate Catalog 2010-12

Counseling and Family Therapy

 

Faculty

Connie Tait (Chair, Barnard 230), Ralph Cohen, H. Jane Fried, Cherie King, Vernon Percy, Judith Rosenberg, Daniel Wiener (Department Secretary, Sarah Atkinson; phone: 860-832-2154)

 

Department Overview

The counseling and family therapy programs at Central Connecticut State University prepare students for professional careers in Marriage and Family Therapy, School Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling, Drug and Alcohol Recovery Counseling, Mental Health Counseling and Student Development in Higher Education. Courses are designed to develop student competence in the application of theory-based counseling models, to understand the concerns of diverse client populations and to enhance students' personal and professional development. The practicum and clinical internship provide students with valuable opportunities to apply their skills in a field-based setting under close supervision. Students must obtain departmental approval prior to beginning their practicums.

Programs are accessible to full- and part-time students, offering flexible advising hours and classes in the late afternoons and evenings.

 

Programs

Master of Science in Counselor Education with Specialization in School Counseling

Program Rationale:

The School Counseling Program prepares students for professional careers as counselors in elementary, middle, and high schools. Emphasis is on a comprehensive and developmental model of school counseling that is described in the National Standards for School Counseling of the American School Counseling Association and a document entitled "Best Practices for School Counseling in Connecticut." The curriculum follows the standards of the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP) and the certification requirements of the Connecticut State Department of Education.

Program Learning Outcomes:

Students in this program will be expected to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of theory, practice, and ethical standards relative to the practice of school counseling;

  • demonstrate appropriate counseling techniques and interventions for use within the academic, career, and personal/social domains;

  • demonstrate the ability to consult and collaborate with teachers, staff, administrators, and community-based organizations in understanding and meeting the needs of all students;

  • promote understanding and appreciation for diverse populations and cultures; and

  • demonstrate knowledge of federal and state laws pertinent to the role, function, and services of the school counselor.

 

Course and Capstone Requirements (48-51 credits):

Graduates are prepared for positions as counselors in public and private schools. The program is designed to meet the certification requirements of the State of Connecticut and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs.

 

Core Courses (12 credits):

CNSL 500 The Dynamics of Group Behavior 3

CNSL 501 Theories and Techniques in Counseling 6

CNSL 503 Supervised Counseling Practicum 3

 

Specialized Courses (33 credits):

CNSL 504 Professional Studies in Counseling 3

CNSL 506 Counseling Children & Adolescents 3

CNSL 520 Guidance Principles, Organization and Administration 3

CNSL 521 Career Counseling and Development 3

CNSL 522 Appraisal Procedures in Counseling 3

CNSL 524 Consulting in the Schools 3

CNSL 525 Multicultural Counseling 3

CNSL 526 Principles of Comprehensive School Counseling 3

CNSL 568 Alcohol and Drug Counseling 3

CNSL 591 Supervised School Guidance Internship
(three credits for two semesters) 6

 

Research (3 credits)

CNSL 598 Research in Counseling 3

 

Capstone (0-3 credits):

Plan A: CNSL 599 Thesis 3

    or

Plan B: Comprehensive Exam (consists of a major case presentation done in conjunction with the student's internship experience)

Prerequisite Courses for Plan B (To be completed while in the program):

Life Span Development (PSY 512) 3

Exceptional Learner (SPED 501) 3

Educational Foundations (EDF 500) 3

 

Fingerprint Based Background Check

Effective July 1, 2010, Connecticut law requires all students in educator certification programs to undergo state and national criminal history background checks before participating in school-based field experiences. The procedures for obtaining the background checks and the length of time they are valid is established by the State Department of Education and the local RESC, and cannot be changed. Students are responsible for the cost of the background check and will be provided with the necessary consent forms and other documents needed to conduct it. As part of the background check, students need to be fingerprinted. Students who fail to pass the background check may be unable to complete their chosen degree program at Central Connecticut State University. The University is not responsible for a student’s inability to complete their chosen degree or certification program.

Graduate students who are not currently employed in the Public School will need to complete the background check before being placed in field experiences or doing research in the schools. Current school employees with background checks in place but who are placed in field experiences or do research outside of the district where they are employed may also be required to complete a new background check.

 

Master of Science in Counselor Education with Specialization in Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling

Program Rationale:

The Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling specialization prepares students to pursue employment in a variety of rehabilitation and mental health agencies. Students may choose a track in either Rehabilitation Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling with a drug and alcohol recovery focus, or Mental Health Counseling. The Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling specialization provides the foundational coursework necessary for individuals interested in national certification as Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC) and/or meeting State of Connecticut Department of Public Health requirements for becoming a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). The curriculum is also approved by the Connecticut Certification Board for students pursuing credentials as Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors (LADC). There are additional post-master’s training requirements for both LPC and LADC candidates. The Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling specialization is accredited by the Commission on Rehabilitation Education (CORE).

Program Learning Outcomes:

Students in the program will be expected to:

  • exhibit behaviors and attitudes appropriate to the professional and rehabilitation counseling profession;

  • demonstrate pertinent and professionally relevant knowledge in the 10 CORE and 9 NBCC curriculum content areas;

  • demonstrate professional behaviors and practice in professional and rehabilitation counseling settings;

  • demonstrate knowledge of current ethical and legal guidelines that influence one's behavior as a counselor; and

  • demonstrate core skills that provide the foundations to understand the professional and rehabilitation counseling process and become more aware of one's interpersonal interactions.

 

Course and Capstone Requirements (60 credits):

Core (30 credits):

CNSL 500 The Dynamics of Group Behavior 3

CNSL 501 Theories and Techniques in Counseling 6

CNSL 503 Supervised Counseling Practicum 3

CNSL 504 Professional Studies in Counseling 3

CNSL 507 Methods of Group Facilitation 3

CNSL 521 Career Counseling and Development 3

CNSL 522 Appraisal Procedures in Counseling 3

CNSL 568 Alcohol and Drug Counseling 3

CNSL 598 Research Methods in Counseling 3

 

Students in the Mental Health track are required to take an additional 24 credits:

CNSL 525 Multicultural Counseling 3

CNSL 560 Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling 3

CNSL 561 Advanced Rehabilitation Counseling 3

CNSL 563 Medical Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling 3

CNSL 564 Rehabilitation and Disability Case Management 3

   or

MFT 541 Introduction to Theories of Family Systems 3

CNSL 571 Mental Health Counseling 3

CNSL 575 Co-Occuring Disorders and Mental Health Counseling 3

CNSL 580 Special Topics Seminars 1-3

   or

CNSL 599 Thesis 3 (see Plan A capstone)


Students in the Rehabilitation Counseling track are required to take an additional 24 credits:

CNSL 525 Multicultural Counseling 3

CNSL 560 Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling 3

CNSL 561 Advanced Rehabilitation Counseling 3

CNSL 563 Medical Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling 3

CNSL 564 Rehabilitation and Disability Case Management 3

CNSL 571 Mental Health Counseling 3

CNSL 575 Co-Occuring Disorders and Mental Health Counseling 3

CNSL 580 Special Topics Seminars 1-3

   or

CNSL 599 Thesis 3 (see Plan A capstone)


Students in the Drug and Alcohol Recovery Counseling track are required to take an additional 24 credits:

CNSL 525 Multicultural Counseling 3

CNSL 560 Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling 3

CNSL 561 Advanced Rehabilitation Counseling 3

CNSL 563 Medical Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling 3

CNSL 564 Rehabilitation and Disability Case Management 3

CNSL 571 Mental Health Counseling 3

CNSL 575 Co-Occuring Disorders and Mental Health Counseling 3

CNSL 580 Special Topics Seminars 1-3

   or

CNSL 599 Thesis 3 (see Plan A capstone)

In addition, all students are required to take:

Internship (6 credits):

CNSL 594 Supervised Clinical Practice Professional Counseling 3 (two semesters fall & spring for a total of 6 credits)


Capstone (0-3 credits):

Plan A: CNSL 599 Thesis 3
   or
Plan B: Comprehensive Exam 0
   (consists of a major case presentation done in conjunction with the student’s internship experience)

Note: It is expected that prior to beginning the supervised counseling practicum (CNSL 503) all Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling students will complete PSY 512. Students in the drug and alcohol recovery program must also complete PSY 454 (Drugs & Behavior) prior to beginning practicum.

 

Master of Science in Counselor Education with Specialization in Student Development in Higher Education

Program Rationale:

The mission of the student development master's degree program is to prepare graduates to function effectively as student development specialists in rapidly changing institutions of higher education. Students are trained to understand and to meet the developmental needs of college students, taking into account worldviews and expectations which are influenced by age, ethnic background, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability status, and other "non-traditional" perspectives. Graduates are prepared to function as student affairs professionals in higher education settings, such as student activities, academic advising, career counseling, orientation, first-year experience programs, residence halls, and learning centers.

 

Program Learning Outcomes:

Students in the program are expected to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of theory, practice, and ethical standards relative to the practice of student development in higher education;

  • demonstrate appropriate counseling, advising, and group facilitation techniques for use with students, staff, and faculty in higher education;

  • demonstrate the ability to collaborate with colleagues throughout their institutions for purposes of creating and assessing learning experiences for students;

  • identify a wide range of world views based on culture and life experience, including their own, and use this understanding to communicate effectively across cultural and personal differences; and

  • demonstrate knowledge of federal and state laws pertinent to roles and functions of student affairs professionals and to the responsible management of colleges and universities.

 

Course and Capstone Requirements (42-45 credits):

Core Courses (12 credits):

CNSL 500 The Dynamics of Group Behavior 3

CNSL 501 Theories and Techniques in Counseling 6

CNSL 503 Supervised Counseling Practicum 3

 

Directed Electives (30 credits):

CNSL 521 Career Counseling and Development 3

CNSL 525 Multicultural Counseling 3

CNSL 530 Student Development in Higher Education 3

CNSL 531 Student Services in Higher Education 3

CNSL 532 Program Design in Student Services 3

CNSL 533 Legal, Financial, and Policy Issues in
Student Affairs 3

CNSL 592 Supervised Internship in Higher Education
(two semesters) 6

ED 598* Research in Education 3

Additional course as approved by advisor 3

 

Capstone (0-3 credits):

Plan A: CNSL 599 Thesis 3

or

Plan B: Comprehensive Exam (consists of a major case presentation done in conjunction with the student's internship experience)

 

*ED 598 may be waived by advisor based on undergraduate record of statistics and research.

 

Admission Requirements for School Counseling, Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling, and Student Development in Higher Education

Admissions to the School Counseling, Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling, and Student Development in Higher Education programs are made on a competitive basis only one time per year. All applications must be completed and received by May 1 for fall admission of the following academic year to the School Counseling program and the Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling program. Applicants for the Student Development in Higher Education program may apply as either full-time or part-time students. The application deadline for admission as a full time student is March 1. Full-time students take 9 credits during fall and spring semesters, follow a prescribed program schedule, attend during the summer, and complete the program in 19 months as a cohort. The application deadline for part-time students is May 1. Part-time students may take 3 or 6 credits per semester and must complete the program within 6 years. Their program of study is arranged with their advisor. Candidates for admission will be selected on the basis of the following criteria:
  1. Grade point average: Minimum 2.70 grade point average (GPA) for all under-graduate courses and a 3.00 for all graduate courses, based on a 4.00 point scale where A is 4.00

  1. Three recommendations from individuals able to testify to the student's suitability as a prospective counselor.

  1. A 2-3 page typewritten (double spaced) essay describing the following:

    a. Reasons for entering the counseling profession.

    b. Personal and professional experiences that influenced you to pursue the counseling profession.

    c. Personal characteristics you believe will contribute to your success as a counselor.
  2. A personal interview by the program's faculty admissions committee. The committee will assess the student's personal attributes and life experiences that might contribute to the student's potential for success as a professional counselor.


Additional Admissions Requirements for School Counseling

  1. Documentation that the applicant has successfully passed all three parts of the Praxis I PPST Test or qualifies for a waiver. More information about the PRAXIS I PPST tests may be obtained by calling 1-800-742-9476 or by accessing the PRAXIS website at www.ets.org/praxis. Applications for the PRAXIS I PSST tests and information about the waiver are available in the kiosk outside of the Office of the Dean, School of Education and Professional Studies, in Henry Barnard Hall.

Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy

Program Rationale:

The Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program leads to a Master's of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy (MSMFT). The program is designed to prepare students for professional careers as marriage and family therapists in a wide variety of settings and roles. First, students are taught theories and techniques of practice in individual and group counseling modalities, as well as developmental theory. The foundation of the specialized training in marriage and family therapy is systems theory, serving as the linchpin for the study of clinical theories and practices that are taught in preparation for clinical training. The philosophy of the program is that a student must integrate theories and techniques as tools for enhancing one's effectiveness as an agent of intervention and change. The program does so by interweaving theory and practice throughout the duration of the training process via graduated practical experiences while studying theory. Thus, through the process of study and practice, the student has an opportunity to incorporate a wide array of learning gradually and comprehensively. The end product of such training is a therapist who is well-grounded in theory and who has had nurturing through an on-going training and supervisory process to use him/herself effectively, professionally, and ethically as an agent of change at a variety of levels. The curriculum is designed to meet academic and clinical requirements for Connecticut licensure for marital and family therapists and AAMFT Clinical Membership.

Clinical placements and intensive faculty supervision emphasize the development of effective therapeutic skills to meet the challenges of the new climate in health care service delivery. Emphasis is also placed on the development of the "person of the therapist." A key theme of the program is respect for diversity of people and lifestyles in families. The program has been awarded accreditation by AAMFT's Commission on Accreditation for MFT Education (COAMFTE).

 

MFT Educational Outcomes (EO):

  1. To develop competent entry-level Marriage and Family Therapists at point of graduation

  2. To advance and disseminate the Metaframeworks paradigm as a valued systemic basis for teaching and practicing marriage and family therapy 

  3. To promote culturally-informed and respectful systemic mental health practice

  4. To promote leadership in the MFT field among our students, faculty, and graduates

 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO):

 As a result of successful completion of the MFT program, students will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in the major schools of marriage and family therapy;

  2. Demonstrate proficiency in practices of systemically-oriented therapy approaches to human problems in a variety of clinical settings;

  3. Demonstrate an articulated personal model of therapy upon which they base their intervention, derived from Metaframeworks;

  4. Show professional identities as Marriage and Family Therapists through participation in activities that facilitate the process of socialization in the field;

  5. Demonstrate knowledge as consumers of MFT relevant research and ongoing professional enrichment through the valuing of continued self study and skill development;

  6. Demonstrate awareness, knowledge, and skills in providing culturally informed MFT;

  7. Demonstrate ability to apply the standards of ethical professional conduct in the field; and

  8. Show a strong and clear sense of self as an intervener in human problems.

Clinical Training in the MFT Program:

During the second year of the MFT program, students complete a practicum experience for two semesters, in which they are placed in approved clinical sites in the community for 12 hours per week and receive an hour of supervision per week by an agency supervisor. This experience provides students with basic skills and techniques in interviewing, clinical assessment, and case management. Students attend a weekly course seminar for one hour per week with a faculty instructor. There are over 60 approved training sites across the state, including mental health centers, youth service bureaus, family service agencies, hospitals, and schools.

Following the practicum, each student undertakes a 12-month, intensive (20-25 hours per week) internship in an approved clinical facility, where the intern may hone his/her skills as an "apprentice" clinician under the mentorship of an on-site supervisor and oversight of a faculty supervisor. The internship is designed to be a much more extensive experience than the practicum experience, with the intern assuming primary responsibility for 12-15 clinical cases per week. The student can expect much guidance during the internship experience, with over three hours per week spent in supervision to discuss clinical assessment, case dynamics, skill development, and use of self in the role of "therapist." By the end of the program, students must complete 500 clinical contact hours with a minimum of 100 hours of supervision of those clinical contact hours under an AAMFT Approved Supervisor.

 

Course and Capstone Requirements

(51 credits):

Prerequisites (12 credits):

PSY 512 Seminar in Developmental Psychology 3

CNSL 500 The Dynamics of Group Behavior 3

CNSL 501 Theories and Techniques in Counseling 6

 

Marriage and Family Therapy specialization (51 credits) - thesis optional:

MFT 541* Introduction to Theories of Family Systems 3

MFT 542 Professional, Ethical, and Legal Issues in Marriage and Family Therapy 3

MFT 543 The Family Life Cycle 3

MFT 544 Families in Context: Gender and Cultural Dimensions 3

MFT 551 Structural/Strategic & Behavioral Family Therapies 3

MFT 552 Experiential, Intergenerational and Psychodynamic Family Therapies 3

MFT 554 Couples therapy 3

MFT 555 Dysfunctional Family Processes 3

MFT 556 Systemic Perspectives on Mental Disorders 3

MFT 557 Action Methods in Marital and Family Therapy 3

MFT 583 Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum I 3

MFT 584 Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum II 3

MFT 585 Marriage and Family Therapy Internship
(3 credits in each of 3 consecutive semesters)** 9

MFT 598 Research Methods in Marriage and Family Therapy 3

Elective required*** 3

 

* This course is taken during the pre-candidacy period along with the three prerequisite courses as a condition for degree candidacy.

** See Capstone requirement (below).

*** May be any graduate course that fits coherently with the student's academic goals, on approval from his or her advisor. The Thesis course (CNSL 599) is not considered an elective (Plan A) and is an additional three (3) credits.

 

During the third semester of MFT 585 (Internship), on completion of a minimum of 300 of the 500 clinical hours required for graduation, all students must complete a capstone project consisting of a comprehensive written examination of a clinical case seen by the student, as well as an oral presentation of the case to MFT faculty and peers. This project is designed to help the student integrate his/her learning experiences in the program. In addition, students also may elect to complete Plan A (Thesis), which adds an additional three (3) credits in the program. Students who pursue the thesis option are also required to complete the clinical capstone during the spring semester of MFT 585.
During the third semester of MFT 585 (Internship), on completion of a minimum of 300 of the 500 clinical hours required for graduation, all students must complete a capstone project consisting of a comprehensive written examination of a clinical case seen by the student, as well as an oral presentation of the case to MFT faculty and peers. This project is designed to help the student integrate his/her learning experiences in the program. In addition, students also may elect to complete Plan A (Thesis), which adds an additional three (3) credits in the program. Students who pursue the thesis option are also required to complete the clinical capstone during the spring semester of MFT 585.

 

 

Admission Requirements for the Marriage and Family Therapy Program

The decision to admit a student into pre-candidacy status for the MFT program is based strictly on the student's grade point average. The admission standard for this program requires a minimum of 2.70 grade point average (GPA) based on a 4.00 point scale where A is 4.00. Students with grade point averages between 2.40 and 2.69 may appeal their denials for admission and request conditional admission. The conditional admission program is a non-candidacy arrangement that allows students to demonstrate the ability to perform successfully in a graduate degree program. It is afforded on a space-available basis to students who are able to demonstrate their potential through additional coursework, relevant life experiences, and/or recommendations from individuals qualified to testify to the students' suitability to be prospective Marriage and Family Therapists. Full admission to the program is not guaranteed-all conditions placed on the student for admission must be met successfully. All students who are accepted into the department are granted pre-candidacy status and are assigned an academic advisor. The advisor will orient the student regarding prerequisites, course scheduling, potential course transfers and substitutions, and the planned program of study.

All students are accepted into the Marriage and Family Therapy program as pre-candidates. Pre-candidacy status allows the student to begin taking classes (see below).

To qualify for Degree Candidacy, students must complete the prerequisite courses (CNSL 500, CNSL 501, and PSY 512) and MFT 541 with a grade of B or better, submit two recommendation forms (supplied by the department and available on-line), and receive favorable ratings on the "Attitudes and Attributes" scale by instructors for CNSL 501 and MFT 541. On completion of these requirements, students meet with their advisors to complete their Planned Programs of Study and the Application for Degree Candidacy. These documents are submitted to the dean of the School of Graduate Studies for final approval and acceptance into the program as Degree Candidates.

The deadline for applying for admission for the fall semester is May 1; the deadline for applying for the spring semester is December 1.

For additional information, please see the MFT program website: http://www.education.ccsu.edu/Departments/Counseling_and_Family_Therapy/Marriage_and_Family_Therapy.asp

 

Other Programs

Post-Master's Study

Post-master's study is available only to graduates of CCSU's Department of Counseling and Family Therapy who are applying to the Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling program. Candidates who complete the master's degree in counseling may be able to continue their education at Central Connecticut State University by applying for admissions to post-master's plan programs in Counseling specialties. Once accepted the student and advisor will develop a planned program of study that must consist of a minimum of 30 credits that are completed within a six-year time period.

 

Advanced Official Certificate Program in Professional Counseling

The Advanced Official Certificate Program in Professional Counseling is designed for practicing counselors who already hold a master’s degree in counseling or pyschology and are preparing for state licensure or advanced practice as a Professional Counselor. A certificate in advanced graduate work in Professional Counseling is issued upon completion of 7-18 credits of selected 500-level courses, with a grade of B or better, designated for the certificate program. Candidates for the OCP who are interested in licensure are responsible for working with the Connecticut Department of Public Health regarding specific required coursework for their Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) eligibility.


Admission criteria for the Advanced Official Certificate Program in Professional Counseling:

  • Master's degree in counseling or psychology with an overall GPA of 3.00 or higher
  • Completion of the application process: Students must formally apply to Graduate Admissions by completing the application form, paying the non refundable application fee of $50 and having official transcripts for each course taken sent by each previously attended University (excluding CCSU) directly to Graduate Admissions
  • Three current professional recommendations
  • Written essay - description of student's motivation for advanced graduate study, past experience and future professional goals
  • Interview with program faculty


All students will be required to take Orientation to Professional Counseling, a one-credit course.

 

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