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English MA Courses, Fall 2012


ENG 500: Poetry and Aesthetics of Poe
Tuesday 4:30-7:10. Professor Paul Karpuk. Prereq.: Admission or conditional admission to a degree program in English or permission of instructor.

ENG 530: Narrative Duplicity in the American Short Story
Traces of postmodernism's assertions about the instability and indeterminacy of language can be found in some of the earliest American short stories. In short stories from the mid-19th century through the early 20th century, we will grapple with such equivocal ideas as the reasons behind such duplicity, the elusiveness of objective narration, the deceptiveness of popular myths, and the formation of the modern grotesque. Wednesday 4:30-7:10. Professor Robert Dunne. Prereq.: Admission or conditional admission to a degree program in English or permission of instructor.

ENG 598: Research in English
Research skills in literature. Introduces the techniques and resources of literary research through an examination of the theory, history, and practice of literary criticism. Monday 4:30-7:10. Professor Stuart Barnett. Prereq.: Admission or conditional admission to a degree program in English or permission of instructor.

ENG 448.01:  Studies in American Literature American Mysticism
Prereq.: ENG 110 or equivalent, junior or senior standing required, permission of instructor recommended for non-English majors. Selected topics in American literature. Students may take this course under different topics for a maximum of 6 credits. Cross listed with AMS 448.  MW 3:05 - 4:20 Prof. Jack Heitner

ENG 448.02:  Studies in American Literature
Prereq.: ENG 110 or equivalent, junior or senior standing required, permission of instructor recommended for non-English majors.   The socially emancipating years between World War One and World War Two inspired groundbreaking developments in American drama, and American culture at large. Our class will explore the literary, historical, and biographical forces that led to such exciting theatrical achievements as Eugene O'Neill's The Hairy Ape, Susan Glaspell's The Verge, Sophie Treadwell's Machinal, Elmer Rice's The Adding Machine, Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour, Clifford Odets's Waiting for Lefty, and Thornton Wilder's Our Town.  W 1:40 - 4:20  Prof. Robert Dowling.

ENG 449.01:  Robert Frost
W 1:40 PM-4:20  Prof. David Cappella

ENG 449.02:  Ralph Waldo Emerson
TR 9:25 AM-10:40 Prof. Melissa A. Mentzer

ENG 449.04:  Norman Mailer
TR 10:50 AM-12:05  Prof. Barry H. Leeds

ENG 458.01:  Close Reading the Sentence
An intensive workshop in which students learn to analyze literature at the sentence level. By studying how sentences are crafted and create meaning, students will also work to develop a personal style based on effective and varied sentence construction.  MW 1:40 PM-2:55  Prof. Candace Barrington

ENG 458.02:  SBL Dickens
MW 10:50 AM-12:05  Prof. Jason Jones

ENG 458.70:  SBL Milton and Wordsworth
W 4:30 PM-7:10  Prof. Brian Folker

ENG 458.71:  SBL Love in the Renaissance
MW 4:30 PM-5:45  Prof. Eric Leonidas

ENG 461.70:  Shakespeare Major Comedies
Close analysis of major comedies and pertinent critical problems.  W 4:30 PM-7:10 Prof. Stephen Cohen

ENG 478.70:  Modern American Poetry
The study of important American poets from Dickinson to the present. M 4:30 PM - 7:10 Prof. Susan Gilmore

ENG 487:  20th Century British Drama
Study of major British playwrights of the twentieth century. Selections may be from the works of Shaw, Coward, Maugham, O'Casey, Eliot, Beckett, Osborne, Pinter, Shaffer, Ayckbourn, Churchill, Gray, Hare, Stoppard, and others.  R 4:30 PM - 7:10 Prof. Heidi Hartwig

ENG 488:  The Georgic Tradition
This course will explore the history of an ancient poetic genre (rooted in didactic farming literature) that later writers would adapt to engage and critique their contemporary literary, socio-political, and philosophical worlds.  MW 10:50 AM-12:05 PM Prof. Gil Gigliotti

 

English MA Courses, Spring 2013

NOTE: Course offerings for Fall 2013 are provisional and subject to confirmation.

ENG 501: Studies in British Literature
Topic TBA. Prereq.: Admission or conditional admission to a degree program in English or permission of instructor.

ENG 540: The Novel (in Theory)
Monday 4:30-7:10. Professor Stuart Barnett. Prereq.: Admission or conditional admission to a degree program in English or permission of instructor.

ENG 448: Contemporary Nonfiction: True Stories Well Told
Some of the finest writers of the last 50 years have published narrative nonfiction, including John Hersey, Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, Truman Capote, John McPhee, Gay Talese, Susan Orlean, Eric Larson, Sebastian Junger, Michael Pollan and many others. In The New York Times Book Review the number of nonfiction titles now outnumbers fiction two to one. What led to the great explosion of creativity in narrative nonfiction and how has it impacted our culture, reading habits, contemporary literature and other media?  MW 12:15-1:30. Professor Mary Collins.

ENG 448: African-American Literature before 1865      
Exploration of earlier African American writers, and the development of the literary history and criticism of the period. TR 12:15-1:30. Professor Melissa Mentzer.

ENG 448: Contemporary American Drama
How have American playwrights staged the contemporary scene?  What changes in American culture do they reflect?  How have they stretched the genre?  We'll consider works by Shepard, Mamet, Vogel, Wasserstein, Kushner, and Anna Deavere Smith and others including a possible foray into American musical theater with The Book of Mormon. Monday 4:30-7:10. Professor Susan Gilmore.

ENG 448: American Myth-Making in Prose and Film
Cultural myths may affirm or radically challenge the static ideals with which a nation identifies itself.  This course will examine, predominantly in 20th-century prose and films, several long-standing cultural myths, such as the American Dream, the Frontier, and Immigration, as well as portrayals of gender and racial roles in American society.  Literary works will include writings by Alger, Cather, Faulkner, James Weldon Johnson, and Mamet; films may include GoodFellas, It’s a Wonderful Life, Mildred Pierce, and Woman of the Year. Wednesday 4:30-7:10. Professor Robert Dunne.

ENG 449: Robert Frost
This course focuses on Frost’s collected poetical works, chronologically covering his eight major books, beginning with A Boy’s Will and ending with Steeple Bush. Several of Frost’s essays, lectures, and letters will also be examined and discussed in relation to his work. The course situates Frost in the Modernist tradition, in the American poetry scene, and analyzes the major themes of his work. Wednesday 1:40-4:20. Professor David Cappella.

ENG 449: Toni Morrison
Thursday 4:30-7:10. Professor Beverly Johnson.

ENG 449: Ernest Hemingway
An intensive study of the life (1899-1961) and works of Ernest Hemingway. TR 10:50-12:05. Professor Barry Leeds.

ENG 458: Conrad, Joyce, Woolf
TR 1:40-2:55. Professor Stuart Barnett.

ENG 462: Shakespeare’s Major Tragedies
Close analysis of major tragedies and pertinent critical problems. MW 9:25-10:40. Professor Kara Russell.

ENG 474: Contemporary American Novel
American novels which have come to prominence since World War II and the changing cultural environment which they reflect. TR 9:25-10:40. Professor Aimee Pozorski.

ENG 488: World Mysticism
TR 3:05-4:20. Professor Jack Heitner

ENG 488: Caribbean Literatures and Diasporas
This course introduces key Caribbean cultural and literary issues, including colonialism, transculturation, and large scale migrations to the U.S. and elsewhere. We examine a variety of important literary works from the Hispanic Caribbean with some comparison to French and English writers and traditions. MW 1:40-2:55. Professor Katherine Sugg.

   

 
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