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EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARDS 2014

FINALISTS, FULL-TIME FACULTY

Marianne Fallon, Psychological Sciences

Aimee Pozorski, English

Thomas Vasko, Engineering

Cindy White, Communications

FINALISTS, PART-TIME FACULTY

Lorraine Libby, Social Work

John Rasimas, Accounting

SEMI-FINALISTS

Michele Dischino, Technology and Engineering Education

Robert Dowling, English

Monique Durant, Accounting

Marianne Fallon, Psychological Sciences

Joseph Farhat, Finance

Fred Latour, Math

Vitcheslav Naoumov, Engineering

Aimee Pozorski, English

Karen Ritzenhoff, Communications

Thomas Vasko, Engineering

Cindy White, Communications

Lorraine Libby, Social Work

John Rasimas, Accounting

 

WINNERS 2013

Full-Time Faculty

Dr. Robbin Smith, Political Science

Part-Time Faculty

Dr. Kara Russell, English

Finalists 2012 EIT Awards

Full-time Faculty

Dr. Robbin Smith, Political Science

Dr. Marianne Fallon, Psychology

Dr. Karen Ritzenhoff, Communications

 

Part-time Faculty

Dr. Donald Rogers, History

Dr. Kara Russell, English

 

CCSU 2012 EIT Honor Roll, Full-Time

Nidal Al-Masoud, Engineering

Tanetta Andersson, Sociology

Carrie Andreoletti, Psychological Science

Stuart Barnett, English

Maria Casas, Modern Languages

Stacy Christensen, Nursing

Diana Cohen, Political Science

Cheryl Crespi, Accounting

Sally Drew, Teacher Education

Monique Durant, Accounting

Mark Evans, Physics & Earth Science

Marianne Fallon, Psychological Science

Joseph Farhat, Finance

James French, Teacher Education

Vicente Garcia, Art

Gilbert Gigliotti, English

Susan Gilmore, English

Ivan Gotchev, Mathematical Sciences

Robin Kalder, Mathematical Sciences

Brian Kershner, Music

Cherie King, Counseling & Family Therapy

Susan Koski, Criminology & Criminal Justice

Frederic Latour, Mathematical Sciences

MaryAnn Mahony, History

Beth Merenstein, Sociology

Edward Moore, Engineering

Brian Osoba, Economics

Fiona Pearson, Sociology

Irena Pevac, Computer Science

Aimee Pozorski, English

Jared Ragusett, Economics

Linda Reeder, Manufacturing & Construction Management

Karen Ritzenhoff, Communication

Delia Sanders, Social Work

Xiaoping Shen, Geography

Jason Sikorski, Psychological Science

Sheila Siragusa, Theatre

Robbin Smith, Political Science

John Tully, History

Thomas Vasko, Engineering

Linda Wagner, Nursing

Sean Walsh, Physical Education & Human Performance

Chad Williams, Computer Science

CCSU 2012 EIT Honor Roll, Part-Time

David Barlar, Accounting

Cheryl Fox, Mathematical Sciences

Kerry Meehan, Teacher Education

Adrienne Milics, Management Information Systems

Kristi Moran, Mathematical Sciences

Kara Russell, English

Donald Rogers, History

Jennifer Walther, Physical Education & Exercise Science

 

CCSU EIT Semi-finalists, Full-Time

Nidal Al-Masoud, Engineering

Diana Cohen, Political Science

Sally Drew, Teacher Education

Monique Durant, Accounting

Marianne Fallon, Psychological Science

James French, Teacher Education

Frederic Latour, Mathematical Sciences

Fiona Pearson, Sociology

Aimee Pozorski, English

Karen Ritzenhoff, Communication

Delia Sanders, Social Work

Jason Sikorski, Psychological Science

Robbin Smith, Political Science

 

CCSU EIT Semi-finalists, Part-Time

 

Kara Russell, English

Donald Rogers, History

Jennifer Walther, Physical Education & Exercise Science

 

 


 

 

 

The EIT Awards FINALISTS VIDEO

 

 

 

2011 Excellence in Teaching Award (EIT) Finalists

    

Abigail Adams, Anthropology


Dr. Adams understands that students can learn in a myriad of ways and incorporates a huge range of techniques in her anthropology classes, from field research and trips aboard to papers and oral presentations. “My hope is that my students will draw on what they learn with me in their own professional, civic and personal lives and that they will expand their personal repertoire of ways to build a healthy society.” Many of the students who wrote recommendations discussed her commitment to their welfare, not just as scholars, but also as individuals.

 




Candace Barrington, English

Cooking for a medieval feast, staging scenes from medieval plays, learning the odd sounds of Old English—these are just a few of the unexpected things CCSU students must do in Dr. Barrington’s extremely interactive Chaucer class. Her strategy: begin with high expectations; articulate clearly defined processes and outcomes; use frequent targeted practice; provide regular feedback; create a community of learners. “Long ago,” she wrote in her Teaching Philosophy Statement, “I realized that I must teach students where they are. That is, if students cannot properly complete an assignment, I do not assume they are incapable. I assume there’s a fundamental skill they don’t know. I teach those skills.”

In their recommendations for Dr. Barrington, the students emphasized her sincere interest in their progress as scholars and as individuals, and her demanding but fair standards. "I sought to prove to her that I was capable of great work," one student wrote. "She wouldn't settle for average and that meant I wouuldn't either."

 

 

David Cappella, English

Dr. Cappella, Co-Director of the Central Connecticut National Writing Project and a professor of English Education classes and Young Adult Literature, sees himself as “a guide, a mentor, a coach…. I can be the living map available to my students as they begin their trek into the intellectual high country of the subject matter.”

In their recommendations, his students celebrated his big heart and intense engagement with them and the material. “One of the most enlightening teaching experiences I had with Dr. Cappella,” one student writes, “was not through his stories, but how he handled a student who was very nervous during a class presentation. She was visibly nervous, shaking and quivering in her speech. Dr. Cappella did not allow her to fail. Instead, he guided her, allowing her a few moments to compose herself. He told her silence was fine.”

 



Fred Latour, Mathematics

With terrific logic and passion, Dr. Latour laid out his teaching principles in his Teaching Philosophy Statement for the EIT Committee: 1) It is very important to make sure that my enthusiasm for the subject is obvious. 2) I always keep in mind my students’ reasons for taking a course and talk about why the material is relevant to their field of study. 3) I have many office hours. 4) I assign homework problems each week—the only way to learn mathematics is to do mathematics.

 His students clearly felt he achieved his own objectives and spoke about the same core issues when praising his teaching. One student wrote: “There are many things that make Dr. Latour standout as an excellent teacher, but the specific attributes I would touch on are his love and passion for math, his amazing ability to bring clarity to sometimes confusing material, and the unique approach he takes in helping students prepare for tests.”

 

 

 

 

Seunghun Lee, Linguistics

Dr. Lee understands many students find linguistics extremely challenging and has developed creative teaching techniques to help them manage the daunting material, include electronic “clickers” that allow him to gauge how well the class is understanding his lecture even as he gives it. If too many students “click,” he slows down and revisits the material.

All of the students who wrote recommendations on his behalf commented on his work ethic and accessibility. “Even after the semester was over, Dr. Lee continued to guide me and other students through the process of preparing our individual presentations [for a conference].” In 2010, three of his LING 598 students presented papers at a TESOL conference at Columbia University in New York; in 2011 that number jumped to six.

 

 




PART-TIME EIT FINALISTS

Amanda Greenwell, English

“My philosophy of teaching is quite simple,” Dr. Greenwell says. “Begin by envisioning the end result and work backwards from there. Meet the students where they are but expect them to rise to excellence.”

   










Kara Russell, English

Dr. Russell accepts that good teaching requires a delicate balance of comfort and discomfort in the classroom both for the teacher and the students. Her students praised her ability to “teach all different type of learners—at the same time!”

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